Rapid Detoxification Through Quick Opiate Detox

Opiate addictions have evolved ever since the 1950s. During this period methadone was preferably used to check on withdrawals. There are several methadone maintenance programs where patients are given methadone to substitute dependence. Other emerging drugs such as buprenorphine can also be used a substitute for drug addiction. For most patients, this alternative is unacceptable due to the physical dependence. For most patients, the ultimate treatment goal remains abstinence.

The first step in checking abstinence involves clearing out the drug from the human body. The process is detoxification. Using opiate receptor antagonists were first recommended in the 1970s. The medications completely interact with the opiate receptors in the brain. Opiate cravings are blocked when the opiates are hindered from accessing the brain. In the 1990s, leading physicians would combine naltrexone with clonidine alongside several other medications that helped in shortening the duration of its withdrawal symptoms.

Over the years, various detoxification protocols have been arrived at. The new accelerated methods involved taking high naltrexone doses that shortened the acute withdrawal symptoms. Once the patient awakens from their anesthesia, the detoxification process is complete. At this point, the body and brain will be opiate-free.



Evidence of rapid opiate detox programs

Recent clinical studies reveal the safety and viability of undergoing anesthesia-related techniques that help people successfully reverse their dependence on opiates. One popular method of opiate detoxification involves Accelerated Opiate Neuro-regulation. The physical dependence of individuals on certain drugs will be chemically reversed.

Patients can be admitted to hospitals after undergoing careful monitoring in private and secure settings. When hospitalized trained medical specialists might be sedated or anesthetized to ensure they enjoy a comfortable sleep. Quick doses of naltrexone are administered when the patient is asleep to reverse the spread of opiates. Another medication is issued to completely free the body of opiates. One day after undergoing the procedure, patients start feeling uncomfortable. They experience diarrhea and energy loss, which is occasionally accompanied by vomiting and sweating. There are no instances of physical cravings experienced.


What are the symptoms of patients who qualify for quick opiate detox?

Some patients might experience chronic pain which escalates the pain dosage in their medications. This demonstrates tolerance to the medications that are brought about by their inaction. This can also spread to patients who physically depend on narcotic drugs. To undergo this procedure, one must not be pregnant or breastfeed. People who are active narcotic users are ineligible for the opiate detox. This applies to alcoholics or heavy cocaine users. Alternatively, if you have never registered any case of liver or kidney disease, diabetes or lung problem, you will be ineligible too.


Are there any risks associated with Opiate Neuro-regulation?

There are several risks tied to medical procedures. Some of the risks involve anesthesia use and sedation. Most of these risks are rare and include nausea, chipped teeth, dehydration, pneumonia, vomiting, and organ failures. The risk of experiencing any serious complication hardly makes a percentage point.



Benefits of quick opiate detox

The procedure of quick opiate detox is fast and can take place in a few hours. It is better tolerated and comfortable than other detox methods. Important is the fact that it’s quite safe and is accompanied by few withdrawal symptoms. Considering it in the long term, the treatment is cost-effective.